Ge-Baek Hosin Sool

Taekwon-Do ITF School

           

Wonhjo tul 원효틀 Won-Hyo pattern

List of patterns

Number of movements:28
Number of attacs:15
Number of hand attacs:11
Number of food attacs:4
Number of blocks:11
Number of hand blocks:11
Number of food blocks:0
Number of ready stances:2
Diagram:

New techniques

1.
kaunde jopčcha čirugi 
kaunde yopcha jirugi
가운데옆차지르기 
a middle side piercing kick 
2.
nadžunde apčcha pušigi 
najunde apcha busigi
낮은데앞차부시기 
a low front snap kick 
3.
koburjo čunbi sogi A 
guburyo junbi sogi A
구부려준비서기 
bending ready stance A while executing a  
4.
kodžong so paro čirugi 
gojung so baro jirugi
고정서바로앞지르기 
fixed stance while executing a punch 
5.
konnun so an pchalmok tollimjo makki 
gunnun so an palmok dollimyo makgi
걷는서안팔목돌리며막기 
walking stance while executing a circular block with the inner forearm 
6.
niundža so sonkchal nopchunde anuro terigi 
niunja so sonkal nopunde anuro taerigi
ㄴ자서손칼높은데안으로때리기 
L stance while executing a high inward strike with the knife-hand  
7.
niundža so pchalmok tebi makki 
niunja so palmok daebi makgi
ㄴ자서목낮대비막기 
L stance while executing a middle guarding block with the forearm 

List of techniques

Ready posture: moa čunbi sogi A moa junbi sogi A 모아준비서기 close ready stance A

1.
niundža so sang pchalmok makki 
niunja so sang palmok makgi
ㄴ자서쌍팔목막기 
L stance while executing a twin foream block 
2.
niundža so sonkchal nopchunde anuro terigi 
niunja so sonkal nopunde anuro taerigi
ㄴ자서손칼높은데안으로때리기 
L stance while executing a high inward strike with the knife-hand  
3.
kodžong so paro čirugi 
gojung so baro jirugi
고정서바로앞지르기 
fixed stance while executing a punch 
4.
niundža so sang pchalmok makki 
niunja so sang palmok makgi
ㄴ자서쌍팔목막기 
L stance while executing a twin foream block 
5.
niundža so sonkchal nopchunde anuro terigi 
niunja so sonkal nopunde anuro taerigi
ㄴ자서손칼높은데안으로때리기 
L stance while executing a high inward strike with the knife-hand  
6.
kodžong so paro čirugi 
gojung so baro jirugi
고정서바로앞지르기 
fixed stance while executing a punch 
7.
koburjo čunbi sogi A 
guburyo junbi sogi A
구부려준비서기 
bending ready stance A  
8.
kaunde jopčcha čirugi 
kaunde yopcha jirugi
가운데옆차지르기 
a middle side piercing kick 
9.
niundža so sonkchal tebi makki 
niunja so sonkal daebi makgi
ㄴ자서손칼대비막기 
L stance while executing a middle guarding block 
10.
niundža so sonkchal tebi makki 
niunja so sonkal daebi makgi
ㄴ자서손칼대비막기 
L stance while executing a middle guarding block 
11.
niundža so sonkchal tebi makki 
niunja so sonkal daebi makgi
ㄴ자서손칼대비막기 
L stance while executing a middle guarding block 
12.
konnun so son sonkut tulkchi 
gunnun so sun sonkut tulgi
걷는서선손끝뚫기 
walking stance while executing a middle thrust with the straight fingertip 
13.
niundža so sang pchalmok makki 
niunja so sang palmok makgi
ㄴ자서쌍팔목막기 
L stance while executing a twin foream block 
14.
niundža so sonkchal nopchunde anuro terigi 
niunja so sonkal nopunde anuro taerigi
ㄴ자서손칼높은데안으로때리기 
L stance while executing a high inward strike with the knife-hand  
15.
kodžong so paro čirugi 
gojung so baro jirugi
고정서바로앞지르기 
fixed stance while executing a punch 
16.
niundža so sang pchalmok makki 
niunja so sang palmok makgi
ㄴ자서쌍팔목막기 
L stance while executing a twin foream block 
17.
niundža so sonkchal nopchunde anuro terigi 
niunja so sonkal nopunde anuro taerigi
ㄴ자서손칼높은데안으로때리기 
L stance while executing a high inward strike with the knife-hand  
18.
kodžong so paro čirugi 
gojung so baro jirugi
고정서바로앞지르기 
fixed stance while executing a punch 
19.
konnun so an pchalmok tollimjo makki 
gunnun so an palmok dollimyo makgi
걷는서안팔목돌리며막기 
walking stance while executing a circular block with the inner forearm 
20.
nadžunde apčcha pušigi 
najunde apcha busigi
낮은데앞차부시기 
a low front snap kick
Keep the position of the hands as they were in 19. 
21.
konnun so pande ap čirugi 
gunnun so bandae ap jirugi
걷는서반대앞지르기 
walking stance while executing a reverse middle punch 
22.
konnun so an pchalmok tollimjo makki 
gunnun so an palmok dollimyo makgi
걷는서안팔목돌리며막기 
walking stance while executing a circular block with the inner forearm 
23.
nadžunde apčcha pušigi 
najunde apcha busigi
낮은데앞차부시기 
a low front snap kick
Keep the position of the hands as they were in 12. 
24.
konnun so pande ap čirugi 
gunnun so bandae ap jirugi
걷는서반대앞지르기 
walking stance while executing a reverse middle punch 
25.
koburjo čunbi sogi A 
guburyo junbi sogi A
구부려준비서기 
bending ready stance A  
26.
kaunde jopčcha čirugi 
kaunde yopcha jirugi
가운데옆차지르기 
a middle side piercing kick 
27.
niundža so pchalmok tebi makki 
niunja so palmok daebi makgi
ㄴ자서목낮대비막기 
L stance while executing a middle guarding block with the forearm 
28.
niundža so pchalmok tebi makki 
niunja so palmok daebi makgi
ㄴ자서목낮대비막기 
L stance while executing a middle guarding block with the forearm 

Ready posture: moa čunbi sogi A moa junbi sogi A 모아준비서기 close ready stance A

Interpretation

Won-Hyo was the noted monk who introduced Buddhism to the Silla Dynasty in the year of 686 A.D.

Won-Hyo

Wonhjo, born in northern Kyongsang Province, was considered wise from birth.

Wonhyo (617 - 686) was one of the leading thinkers, writers and commentators of the Korean Buddhist tradition. Legend says he was born in a forest in Chestnut Valley under a Sal tree. The Sal tree is often associated with significant figures in the legends.

Wonhjo real name was Sol Sedang. He took pseudonym Wonhjo because the name of "Sedang" had the same meaning. He started use this pseudonym in his later years, after he became famous Buddhist philosopher and poet. In the past, Koreans have had many names. Each person had a nickname and the official name. Artists and intellectuals used to have often pseodonyms. Monks and apprentices often received another name from his master.

Wonhjo began his career in 20 years when he decided to enter a Buddhist monastery and transform his own home at the temple. However, at the time Buddhism wasn´t a popular religion in Silla. Although this religion was introduced into the kingdom of Koguryo in 372 and Baekje in 384, the inhabitants of Silla refused to accept it. Monk A-Tow tried to introduce Buddhism to Silla between 417 and 457, but religion was limited to the royal family and the people rejected it.

However, the religious situation has changed in the 7th century. At that time, Silla was at war with the kingdoms of Koguryo and Packche was under constant invasion from Paekche. In 642 he lost under attack from Baekje 40 castles, including a large castle Taeya near the capital. This atmosphere dramatically influenced the Buddhist faith of all three kingdoms. Religion became more nationalistic, which led to an escalation of violence of fighting.

To accelerate the development of this type of national spirit in Silla King Pop-Hung wanted in the year 527 officially adopt Buddhism. He tried to appoint it as an official religion around Kyongju. An attempt was met with fierce opposition of members of the Court. In the year 528 these members of the court forced the king to agree with the execution of 22-year-old monk Ichadona for that convinced king of the usefulness of Buddhism. Ichadonova death for their faith in Buddhism resulted in stories of his blood on the scaffold was white as milk. These stories made him a martyr, and so the king issued a royal mandate that authorized the Buddhist faith. Shortly afterward, Buddhism was accepted by the people. In later years, King Hun-Duk said Ichadona as one of ten sacred monks of Silla. The study of Buddhism during the reign of King Pop-Hung required the ability to read and write Chinese, so real students were still mostly monks and nobles.

Unfortunately, there was not too many places in Silla where real interested person could study Buddhism. Therefore, in the year 650 Wonhjo and monk Ui-Sang (625-702, founder of Korean schools Hwaom) went to study Buddhism in China. The journey led them to Liaotung in Koguryo. Several local guards, however, confuse them with spies and they narrowly escaped and returned to Silla. There is no other record that Wonhjo traveled to China for study, although one more attempt was made soon after Baekje was defeated by Silla and Tang´s troops from China in 660. However, this study was not necessary because Wonhjo was wise from birth and did not need a teacher. For this reason, he was the only monk of his time who did not complete the study in China.

Legend says that in 661 Wonhjo with Ui-Sang went to China, where they wanted to continue to study Buddhism. Somewhere in the region of Baekje is caught torrential downpour and forced them to hide in the shelter, they thought that it is a stone shrine. Wonhjo got thirsty at night, so he felt the vessel, which thought that it is a gourd and drank cold, refreshing water from it. However in the morning companions awaited surprise, because their hideout was an ancient tomb littered with human skeletons and the vessel from which Wonhjo drank, was in fact a human skull filled with moldy water. Moved by this experience, Wonhjo was impressed by the power of the human mind to transform reality. Based on this experience, he left the priesthood and began to spread Buddhism as a layman.

There were at least five main sects of Buddhism in Silla at this period (Kyeyul, Yulban, Chinpyo, pop songs and Hwaom), which were constantly competing. Wonhjo is considered one of the most influential monks in this time thanks to his efforts to unite these sects.

Wonhjo is also considered one of the most productive writers of all Buddhist countries of his time. He wrote more than 100 literary works, numbering about 240 volumes. Unfortunately, only 20 works with a total of 25 volumes survived.

Literature was not the only area in which Wonhjo gained recognition. He was well known in both the general population and among members of the royal family and the courtyard. Often he was asked to lead prayers and sermons at the royal court. In 660 King Muyo Wonhjem was so impressed with Wonhyo that he asked him to live in the royal palace Yosok. Here, the relationship with princess Kwa developed and was soon followed by marriage and the birth of their son Sol-Chong.

In adulthood Sol-Chong became one of the ten Confucian sages Silla era. He was recognized for his degree in Chinese literature and history and for its treatment of IDU - system of using Chinese characters for phonetic record Korean songs and poems. Since Korea has not had an alphabet, this adjustment was very important. It make available Chinese literature to the general public, as a result of providing translation method. Sol-Chong was apparently the author of many original works, but his Kye-Hwa-Wang is the only work that has survived.

Shortly after the birth of his son Wonhjo left the palace and began traveling the country. It was recognized as a great scholar of Chinese dynasties Tang, although he has never studied there, and he was highly respected by the people of Korea. He hated the differences between faiths, who were constantly disputed, and thus he created his own ideology, where conflicts between different religions could be removed. In 661 he developed ideology Chongto-Gyo (Pure Land). This sect did not require study of the Chinese Buddhist literature, but sought merely diligent prayer. Her philosophy was that it is possible to be saved, or enter the "Pure Land" with a simple prayer. This fundamental change in Buddhist philosophy made religion available to the lower classes. It soon became very popular among the whole population. However, Wonhjo greatest achievement was his effort to alleviate the poverty and suffering of ordinary people. In 662 Wonhjo left the priesthood and devoted the rest of his life traveling the country and the teaching of this new religiosity of ordinary people. Wonhjo contribution to the cultural and national awareness of Silla assist in the unification of the three kingdoms of Korea.

Wonhjo died in 686 and was buried by his son Sol-Chong in Temple Punhwang-So. He has experienced unification of the Three Kingdoms of Korea and helped bring brilliant culture in Korea through his efforts in Buddhist philosophy. He had a profound impact on quality of life in Silla and Buddhism in Korea, China and Japan.

Pattern is practised by the 6. Gup holder and above.